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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
correspondent kim ghattas and her book, "the secretary: a joinny with hillary clinton from beirut to the heart of american power." in it, ms. ghattas examines ms. clinton's role and seeks to answer whether u.s. power is in decline. the program is about an hour. >> host: i think where we should begin is to talk a little bit about your biography, because i think as much as this book is about hillary clinton and her time as secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut to covering the secretary of state around the world. so why don't you just begin by talking a little bit about where you came from. >> guest: well, great. sure. jamie, thank you for having me, and i'm flighted by your first question because, of course, the biggest star in the book is hillary clinton herself, but this isn't just a biography of an historic woman, it's also a different take on the whole issue of american power. and as you mention, i come from beirut. i grew up there. i was born in beirut in the middle of the civil war in 1977, and i lived my whole life in lebanon, first 13 years in war and then the r
clinton from beirut to the heart of american power." she conditions miss clinton's role, and whether u.s. power is in decline. the program is about an hour. >> where we should begin is to talk about your biography. i think as much as this book is about hillary clinton and her time as secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut to covering the secretary of state around the world. so, why don't you just begin by talking about where you came from. >> guest: great. thank you very much for having me. i'm delighted to be here and delighted by your first question. the star, the biggest star in the book is hillary clinton herself. but this isn't just a biography of an historic woman. it's also a different take on the whole issue of american power, and as you mention i come from beirut. i grew up there i was born in beirut in the middle of the civil tbhar 197- -- civil war in 1977 and i lived my whole life in lebanon, 13 years in war, and then the rest of the time, there was not exactly a stable country, so we've been through many, many ups and downs, and i lived through all
. an interview with kim ghattas and her book, trailing. she examines mrs. clinton's role in u.s. diplomacy abroad and also seeks to answer by the u.s. power is in decline. the program is about one hour. >> host: i think we should begin is to talk about your biography. as much as this book is about hillary clinton at a time the secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut, the sector of state around the world. so why don't you become a talking about where you came from. >> guest: thank you very much for having me. i'm delighted to be here and and a lot of by your first question. the biggest are in the book is hillary clinton herself. but this isn't just a biography of a historic woman. it's also a different take on the whole issue of american power. as you mentioned i come from beirut. i grew up there. i was born in beirut in the middle of the civil war in 1977. i did -- spit my whole life in lebanon. first 13 years in war and then the rest of the time that some people may know, beirut is not exactly this table country. so we've been through many, many ups and downs but i lived
for 2016 a week before the supreme court hears arguments on same-sex marriage. hillary clinton today endorses gay unions. >> lgbt americans are our colleagues, our teachers, our soldiers, our friends. our loved ones. and they are full and equal citizens and deserve the rights of citizenship. that includes marriage. >>> gop soul-searching. republicans try to find out what went wrong in 2012. >> there's no one reason we lost. our message was weak, our ground game was insufficient. we weren't inclusive. we were behind in both data and digital, and our primary and debate process needed improvement. so there's no one solution, there's a long list of them. >>> but is this their blueprint for victory? >> mr. president, we admit it, you won. accept it. now step away from the teleprompter and do your job. >> if standing for liberty and standing for the constitution makes you a whacko bird, then count me a proud whacko bird. >> more background checks? dandy idea, mr. president, should have started with yours. >> bon voyage, president obama prepares for his first trip to israel since becoming p
and bill clinton met at camp david with-- >> was he a terrorist. >> you can't do-- it doesn't matter whether he was or not. you have to deal with-- if you're going to have peace you have to work with both parties. you don't have to like both parties, but. >> sean: cover up the cross, but speak under a picture of arafat. >> we were meeting with abbas' on their turf, in their presidential arena and you come-- if you come to the white house, if you come to the white house and meet with our president and you don't like the fact that george washington is sitting over a desk-- >> george washington isn't a terrorist. and wait, i have a question. >> the british probably thought he was. >> sean: was he a terrorist? >> of course he was. >> sean: thank you, thank you. but the british probably thought that george washington was a terrorist. >> sean: if i was president, billy cunningham, i wouldn't speak under a picture of a terrorist. >> sean hannity we wondered what a second jimmy carter term would look like we now know. there's a line in north korea, don't cross the line, nuclear bombs are goi
marriage advocates find an ally in former secretary of state hillary clinton. what does the push tell us about future political plans? >> it's tuesday, march 19th, 2013. "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert in for chuck todd who just landed in israel. we start with breaking news out of nevada where six u.s. marines have been kill and eight wounded in an explosion that occurred in a training exercise overnight at the army's hawthorne depot and storage facility in western nevada. we go now for the latest. jim, was this an accident or did somebody do something wrong? >> it was clearly an accident according to u.s. military officials who say that the six marines were killed and eight others wounded in a live fire training exercise at the hawthorne army depot early this morning. according to the officials, there several accounts. one that has the marines loaded and a 16-millimeter mortar shell and it exploded then. the round may have exploded as the marines were picking it up and taking it to them. according to the officials, four were killed instantly and two others died while waiting to be
on the people of israel, bill clinton, george w. bush, comes as president, cold in nature, was distancing himself to israel. the message the israelis got across the spectrum was he doesn't like us. he doesn't talk to us. and he doesn't care about us. >> rose: that's the perception in israel. >> that is corct. and of coue it was reinforced by the fact that almost simultaneously to his election israel chose the right wing prime minister who replaced olmert who was wing to go a long distin to make a palestinian deal. >> rose: and before that barak. >> an before that ariel sharon who took a bold step in gaa -- gaza. so the israeli, the israeli political system responded to threats to the threat of iran, to the threat of hezbollah, israel, between 2006 and 2009, went to the right. both the public opinion and the government. so the drama of the collision between the president seeking to draw close to arab and muslims and israeli government veering to the right, intensified the tension that manifested itself at the time. and add to this the fact that between the president and the prime minister
. u.s. president bill clinton looked on as yasser arafat and israeli leaders shook hands. nevertheless, prospects for peace were shaken when palestinian extremists intensified their campaign of terror. for its part, israel broke with accords by refusing to dismantle settlements in the west bank and gaza strip. washington changed its middle east chad agee following the attacks of september 11. americans were more focused on the war on terror. peace with the palestinians took a back seat. but in 2002, president george de b. bush outlined a two-state solution when he presented what was called the road map. again, the three-that peace plan failed to stop the spiraling violence. on a visit to egypt in 2009, a newly elected president obama but washington's traditional relations with israel to the test when he sought to mend ties with the islamic world. >> i have come here to cairo to seek a new beginning between the united states and muslims around the world. >> but obama failed to meet expectations in the islamic world, and many criticized what they called half-hearted efforts to achieve pe
' are trivializing these issues. every president had problems besides bill clinton because israel does not want to establish a two-state solution and that's the-- >> and he said he was going to fix this and he wasn't able to. saying america was arrogant in cairo didn't work, did it, colonel west? >> well, sean, let's start with andrea mitchell over at msnbc, said this is the worst relationship she's seen and she's been covering since ronald reagan. and the first interview was al-arabi al-arabiya. and in cairo talked about a new beginning between the united states and muslim world. i think we've seen pan out a muslim brotherhood government in control and we misread the arab spring and the muslim brotherhood said they wouldn't run someone for president and they did. we've seen hamas stronger as well as hezbollah, islamic jihad. and we've seen incredibly unstable situation in syria. when i was there on a congressional visit and we sat down with president netanyahu, one thing he asked, he was concerned about iran and the dominance and occurred and we have the iranian guard in syria. and their march
the united states gets it over israeli objections. >> my perspective goes back to the clinton administration because i was working for president clinton in the second term. he was clearly personally dedicated to peace. he reached out. i think we got close. he got close at camp david. it does show the united states in that example can be both israel's ally and the broker who brings everybody together and, by the way, we would be talking later if you look at i don't think peace with jordan, for example had much of a cold war significance. i think we really have tried to encourage -- >> he could have gotten that any time. that was an easy deal. >> i'm not sure it was that easy but you want happened. let's cheer our successes when they do. there are some examples where israel has been able to make peace with its neighbors. it's a good thing. >> here's my question. this is an interesting point. if you move in the circles of basically kind of center left over, right, which people who are liberals zionist, who love israel but want a two state solution all the way to people who are, don't agree with
weapons ban passed in 1994 and that required a lot of arm twisting on the part of president bill clinton on members of his own part for exactly this reason, because there are a lot of democrats and in a lot of red states with very big gun cultures and significant opposition to gun control measures that clinton really had to work every bit of political capital he had to get that done in '94. barack obama has shown, even though they gave all of these remarks in the state of the union address and elsewhere, megyn, that he's just not willing to pick up that fight and die on this particular hill. harry reid looks at his caucus and says, look, i've got 55 democrats in my senate caucus here. i can't get 40 votes for this. i've got a number of very vulnerable democrats coming up in red states like alaska, arkansas, louisiana. >> megyn: north carolina. >> west virginia, north carolina, montana for example, i don't want them dying on this hill and i'm going to strip it out. have it voted on, they will vet a vote, and on an amendment and that means the death of the ban. >> megyn: even dianne feinst
is expected of me? i will never forget a trip i took to -- right after clinton had seen president assad in geneva. prior to the trip, the prime minister conveyed to us what it was he wanted out of it. he produced what he wanted to see come out of it. i walked into the meeting feeling highly confident. we did what you asked. the first thing he did was immediately devalue what i came with. why did he do it? because he knew i was coming to ask something of him. if you go into these meetings in the expectations are very high, each reader is suddenly worried about what you are going to ask of them. when are low, you are in a better position to have a serious conversation and can explore the possibilities. maybe the way you frame that conversation is by talking about, what are the consequences of not getting anything done? with each side. if they are severe enough, how can we think together about what it is that could be possible? where could there be some points of commonality we could build on? i expect you will have, there will end up being serious conversations in private that are much mo
intelligence. i think, i would add everyone from nancy pelosi to john kerry to bill clinton and denny blair -- tony blair thought saddam hussein was reconstituting the wmd program and used chemical weapons before. there are things we could do better going forward. >> bret: i said operation enduring freedom. that was afghanistan. iraqi freedom, the iraq operation. a.b., you look at how it came to an end. and the violence on the ground now. and what do you think? >> well, that is what is so hard. you look a year-and-a-half, year-and-a-half after the official end of the war and hard to say we protected the gains we made there. not everything we did was wrong. there was a lot of good accomplished. the problem is iranian influence on the rise, al-qaeda getting strong there. a lot of violence that you mentioned. that leaves at it scary play. and, you know, it really to me is a turning point in history in way that the world perceives american strength. our own people marx yourty of americans think they think it was a mistake. the premise of the war will a be questioned, so will the results. >> bre
months. you can see the administration is not cooperating. secretary clinton, did she even go visit the wounded out at bethesda? you need subpoena power really to protect the federal employees. their careers are on the line. if you're 50 years old, you don't want to get across the bricks with your boss and lose your jobs with maybe kids in college, have a mortgage. so you will have to have a select committee. you will have to subpoena them. this can be done in private. otherwise the american people will never know. bill: let me cut right to this now. you mentioned cover-up. what are they trying to cover up? >> well i think that is what the select committee will find out. what happened that day? why did it take so long? are we not interviewing? why did secretary clinton when she talked about the four people who were heroes who died, why did she not mention those who were wounded? we have an obligation to them. we should honor them. we should thank them. there are more questions out here than there are answers. bill: another question for you then. the house committee has subpoena powe
on almost a daily basis. first, secretary hillary clinton helped to spearhead the reforms bat created a coherent syrian opposition council. now you have the secretary kerry, who is deeply involved in that effort as well. we are providing not just advice, but training and capacity in order for that political opposition to maintain links within syria and be able to provide direct services for people inside of syria, including the relief efforts that obviously we are seen here in jordan, but there is a whole bunch of people internally displaced inside of syria who need help. i think that what your question may be suggesting maybe is, why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and you know, i think it is fair to say that the united states oftentimes it finds itself in situations where if it goes in militarily, and if it does not, then people say, why are you doing something militarily? and you know, my response at this stage is to make sure that what we do contribute to bringing an end to the bloodshed as quickly as possible. and working in a multilateral context, an international context,
president clinton signed in 1996 which bans federal marry i marital bs for same sex couples legally married in their states. you said that states have the right to de. to the is conservative isn't marriage a state issue and federal interferences wouldn't that be unconstitutional? >> i don't think so and neither did a democratic president. a lot of people are changing their minds because there has been a full court blitz by the popular culture by elites, by all kinds of folks to intimidate and cower people and no longer defend marriage as being between a man and a woman. >> chris. >> chris: go ahead, nicolle. >> chris, chris, the biggest problem that mr. bauer faces not just this morning but moving forward is that more than 65% of his own base self-describing evangelical christians under the age of 33 support marriage eequality. 80% of people in this country right, left, democrat, republican, man, woman, support marriage equality. more than 60% of all americans everyone supports marriage equality. and that very same activist court that he railed against with such hostility this morning alway
be allowed. we've seen the president, obama change his mind. president clinton changed his mind. hillary rodham clinton came out and spoke about it. republican rob portman spoke about it. and i think, wolf, there's a question here about whether this shift in public opinion is actually going to affect the supreme court. those justices sitting on the bench. when you talk to both sides of the argument, one side says, the side that's for same sex marriage, will say, you know, maybe it will help us because the court won't think it's such a heavy lift to rule in favor of same sex marriage. they won't be going against public opinion and in the way they were against interracial marriage, for example. or on the other side, they say the court will also say, look. it's proceeding in the states. you know, you now have eight or nine states who have approved same sex marriage. public opinion is shifting. let it play out with the voters and the court's not the place to do it. >> they're very conservative ideas at play here, too. back in 1996 when the court passed the defense of marriage act a lot of pe
did this and president johnson did this and in my judgment president clinton did this remarkably wem. and i think president obama is getting better. today he's meeting with 13 senators tonight at the jefferson hotel in washington. which maybe our conference helped move along. but it is tough -- i want to mention one other thing. it's tough because it's hard tore deal with the congress and sometimes it's unpless tonight deal with the congress. but there is no other choice, the president must engage. but one of the other issues i want to raise quickly is another factor, and charlie you talked about this a bit. in the days we were building this country, the space program and all these wonderful things it was easier to work together. let's look at the things they are dealing with today, sequester, how are we going to cut medicare, social security, how are we going to get the budget down. these are tough. these are politically difficult positions to take. in an environment where everything is just cutting and reducing, it's not natural for people to enjoy doing the job under those circums
this as good as anybody, and my judgment president clinton did this remarkably well. i think president obama is getting better. today, he's meeting with 13 senators at the jefferson hotel in washington. maybe that will help our conference move along. but it is -- it is tough because -- i want to mention one other thing. it is tough because it is harder to deal with the congress and sometimes it is unpleasant to deal with the congress. but there is no other choice. the president must engage and it is a learning experience. one other issues i wanted to raise quickly. another factor and charlly talked about this. -- charlie talked about this. it was easier to work together. look at what they are dealing with, sequester, cutting, how do we cut medicare? when are we going to cut social security? how do we get the budget down? >> these what i call tough -- almost impossiblely difficult positions to take. in an environment where everything is reducing, cutting, it is not natch for people to enjoy doing the job under those circumstances. they don't feel positive to each other and friendly to reach o
administrations and a former obama adviser as well. so clinton bush and obama, all of the above. first of all to you, jeffrey, your reaction to the speech today. you were there in the hall, the feeling from the young people. admittedly, more supportive of obama perhaps than the overall israeli public. >> maybe, but i mean many university students do lean right. most amazing thing about it for me was a huge ovation when president obama called for the creation of a palestinian state in different iterations and i was thinking when i was in there, if he had given that speak at an apec convention in washington, he might have been booed. i'm trying to imagine what arab audiences across the muslim world were thinking when they saw israelis cheer obama for calling, for palestinian state. it was kind of a brief moment of possibility there. >> and dennis, you spent so many years trying to make this happen, do you think in retrospect, that the administration got off on the wrong foot with prime minister netenyahu, the cairo speech, not following it up perhaps and calling for the settlement freeze in yea
. >> right. >> chris: which president clinton signed in 1996. which bans federal marital benefits for same sex couples who are legally married in their states. you have acknowledged states have the right to declare, to decide that same sex marriage is legal. as a conservative, isn't marriage a state issue and, therefore, should federal interference, wouldn't that be unconstitutional? >> well, i don't think so. and near did a democratic president and overwhelming -- >> he changed his mine, though. >> of course a lot of people are changing their minds because there has been a full-court blitz of -- blitz by the popular culture, by elites and all kinds of folks to intimidate and to cower people into no longer defending marriage between a -- >> let me bring -- go ahead, nicole. >> chris, chris, the biggest problem that mr. bauer faces, not just this morning but moving forward is that more than 65% of his own base, self-describing evangelical christians, under the age of 33, support marriage equality. 80% of people in the country, right, left, democrat, republican, man, woman, support marriage
, 185 different welfare programs and block grants the largest and most expensive ones just as clinton did with aid to families with children. we have this reform of entitlement and reform of these welfare programs and tax reform taking the top rate on individuals to 25% and the bottom rate to 10%. now we go from 10 up to 44 and the corporate rate which is 35% right now. the average in europe is 25 so we compete internationally. we tax our companies and our manufacturing companies more harshly than they do theirs. we want to take that rate to 25. i would rather be better than europe and the canadians are at 17%. i preferred the canadian rate than the european average so the republicans and democrats in their two budgets really show who they are. there is also a third budget which is the congressional budget which is more liberal democrats and they do massive new taxes on top of the ones i discussed. you have a sense of there are some democrats who want to go even further into big government and patty than patty murray and president obama. >> host: americans for tax reform is best known
? >> they've got a long memory but if hillary colin con couldn't negotiate this -- if hillary clinton couldn't negotiate this, i don't think john kerry will be able to deliver anything differently. that status of force agreement was critical. i think we should remember this when we are dabbling in whether or not to have a long-term presence and influence in afghanistan, the problem is iraq is that much more important. it is strategically more significant and we let it slip away. >>brian: after all that hard work and sacrifice. thanks so much. 17 after the hour. thanks for joining us this morning. >>> remember those shovel-ready projects? why are we now paying for a gas tax? fox business's charles payne is here telling us where that money is going. >> it was the ad no one was supposed to see. supposed to see. now ford is under fire. what's droid-recognition ? understanding you clearly... what is the capital of zimbabwe ? ... the first time you ask with the google voice search. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid recognition. droid powerful. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes s
it is clinton continued to rise. at some point we have to think differently about what we are doing with people. i have constituents have family and children. we all want to be protected from dangerous people. at some point, as a country, -- you have been running the fbi, you have had a few of this from a lot of different perspective. the committee is going to be wrestling with these issues over the next decade. the more people we lock up the more we put into prison, the greater share this budget is going to be taking up. -- ie same time these tried to protect our country from terrorism. they're going to be shrinking relative to its portion of the budget. the chairman has been the biggest supporter of the fbi that congress is ever seen. i have seen him in the private rooms when there are just four of us. the question because this, as a country as society deal have eighth thoughts about -- do you have any thoughts about making to we want to put in a prison cell and spend money to keep them locked up. we might have to think about a different approach in terms of seeking punishment for their trans
, a former ambassador to n.a.t.o. and secretary under president clinton and now you've got president obama morsi discussing the collapse of egypt. and that's something we don't want over here and that's one of the reasons we're keeping an eye over there. >> i don't see the prospect of the state collapsing, but i think that morsi's actions showed why people feared having a muslim brotherhood government in power, that it would be a one person, one vote, one time experience, and i have to say, the fact that the military so far is silent, could indicate they're prepared to acquiesce in this. although people have said that the brotherhood and the military could never come to an agreement on rule in egypt. i've always believed that's a possibility. so i think this is very, very serious and it's one reason i favor suspending both economic and military aid to egypt until this gets resolved. >> rick, where is this going? because you know, they got rid of hosni mubarak out there because he was dictatorial and ruled with an iron fist and wanted something more akin to democracy and now you've fot pres
that, the israeli leadership doesn't trust him. to borrow an old phrase from our friend bill clinton that dog won't hunt after this trip at least in the short term. look at these pictures tonight. president obama at a state dinner in his honor in israel sitting shoulder to shoulder, literally at times forehead to forehead with the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. for several minutes the two leaders, allegedly this frosty relationship, joking, laughing, talking, covering their mouths to make sure those with cameras couldn't figure out what they were saying. this the latest in several scenes where both of the leaders, maybe they're acting but they are very good actors if they are. they have made a clear decision to try to get along better as they move on to the long list of challenges. as the trip wraps up in the morning if there is a risk for the president it's this. he came in with low expectations and may have raised expectations and hopes too high. you've covered this issue for many years. the president talking to young israelis today demanding they challenge their leader
clinton has called this feeling of disbelief on both sides. so i'm still not convinced yet, joe, that this administration wants to go into laborious detail when it comes to trying to broker a peace agreement, particularly because of the threat that iran poses because of whatever the end game is in syria. those concerns may overwhelm. >> let's go to senator coons on syria. just curious in terms of, obviously, the topic of chemical weapons is being raised now as a possibility. the president has called that a game changer. some would say that 70,000 people dead might be that as well. are we talking now about the inevitably come action here, collective or singular? >> yes, mika. i think it's important that the american people be aware that circumstances on the ground in syria continue to change in ways that will move us closer and closer to some sort of multilateral action, particularly if there is a confirmation that the assad regime in syria has used chemical weapons in violation of international law and basic humanitarian rights. i think it was vital that president obama went to
been clinton. it was an executive order, if you look it up. i just looked at the extra taxes and the things being added on now. it is really threatening to the american public to hear all of this. this is a medium we have all learned how to use. we have all enjoyed it. host: we will leave it there, charles. is this a case of the law trying to catch up with the events -- advancements in technology? guest: i think it is. our understanding of how the law should apply to whatever we do online has changed as well. in 1986, we were not storing our most private documents in the cloud. you are not using texting medications as a substitute for making phone calls. now we do. we expect that we communicate with someone through e-mail, there is a certain level of privacy attached to those communications. be a little bit ahead of congress. the court -- caller may be a little bit ahead of congress. the court of appeals set individuals that a reasonable expectation of privacy when they used an e-mail to communicate. that expectation does not go away when the e-mail reaches a certain age. we
president clinton had seen president assad in geneva in january 1994. and prior to the trip, we had, you know, the prime minister conveyed to us what it is he wanted to see come out of it. and we actually produced what it is he wanted to see come out of it. so i walked into the meeting with rabin feeling highly confident, you know, all right, we did what you asked. and the first thing he did was immediately devalue what i came with. now, why did he do it? because he knew i was coming to ask something of him. and if you go into these kinds of meetings and the expectations are very high, then each leader is suddenly worried about what you're going to ask of them. when the expectations are low, you're in a much better position to have a serious conversation, and you can actually explore, all right, what are the possibilities here. but maybe the way you frame that conversation is by talking about what are the consequences of not getting anything done with each side? and if the consequences are severe enough, how can we think together about what it is that could be possible, and where could t
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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